Jeffrey Blondes

Visit Artist's Website Download Artist's CV Bray/Moore on Jeffrey Blondes Erika Lederman in Photomonitor 2013 12 Degrees of Separation working sketchbook

Trained as a painter, with a career that includes over 35 solo exhibitions in galleries around the world, Blondes’ last 10 years have been devoted to making high definition films ranging in length (to date) from 9 to 76 hours. The preoccupation of these films is the point at which landscape and time meet. (This will make sense to anyone familiar with his painting as his primary instinct has always been to watch, wait and record en plein air the subtleties of nature at play in any given landscape.) As Drs Bray and Ede observed in their essay on his work: “Although Blondes is still the mediator……, film provides [the viewer] with such direct exposure to his subject that it is as though a veil has been lifted. Nature has essentially been brought inside our domestic space and because we see landscape out of its normal context, the viewer is even more acutely aware of it. Watching the films, time seems to pass inexorably slowly with the effect that one is transfixed when at last we see some movement in the landscape.”

Loch Shiel  2015red-dotred-dotred-dotred-dotred-dot

High definition (ProRes422); 24 hour loop; edition of 7

Camera on motorised rostrum, turning 360˚ in 24 hours; filmed dawn to dusk over two days.

This is not the actual film. These sequences are a selection of 20 second segments with no transitions, excerpted from the original work.

Le Grand Etang  2015red-dotred-dot

High definition (ProRes422); 2 x 24 hour loop; edition of 7

Le Grand Etang, a 200-acre pond in the Brenne is emptied every 15 years so that banks can be rebuilt, and silt deposits removed. By midsummer, when filming began, it had transformed into an enormous field of grasses, flowers and crops. Water was slowly reintroduced in October, and gradually refilled the space until it became re-established as an enormous pond.Blondes filmed sunrise for one hour at the beginning of each month, and sunset for another at month’s end, using two cameras facing in opposite directions mounted on a rotating motor that turns 360 degrees in 24 hours. The result is two 24- hour films played as a diptych on adjacent screens – each encapsulating one year. Two slowly rotating pans of the same segment of landscape shot at an interval of six months; so that one screen might show a field in August, and the other the same view in February once the pond refilled.

This is not the actual film. These sequences are a selection of 20 second segments with no transitions, excerpted from the original work.

Phillips Ridge  2014red-dotred-dotred-dotred-dot

High definition (ProRes422); 51 hour loop; edition of 7

Fixed camera on the Snake River Tributary, Wilson WY. Filmed from sunrise to sunset at each of the four seasons.

This is not the actual film. These sequences are a selection of 20 second segments with no transitions, excerpted from the original work.

SpringAutumnSummerWinter  2014

High definition (ProRes422); 52 hour loop; edition of 7

Fixed camera under Aspens in Wilson WY. Filmed from sunrise to sunset at four times of the year showing the transition from Spring to Autumn to Summer to Winter.

This is not the actual film. These sequences are a selection of 20 second segments with no transitions, excerpted from the original work.

Tierra del Fuego 360˚ Forest  2013red-dotred-dot

High definition (ProRes HQ); 24 hour loop; edition of 7

Filmed at the South-Eastern tip of Argentinian Tierra del Fuego.The 360 degree cycle documents a graveyard of trees, felled or left standing virtually dead after being attacked by beavers. This non-native species, introduced 80 years ago, has multiplied from a colony of 50 to a current population estimated to number over 200,000. With no natural predators on the island to regulate the population, they are ‘eating themselves out of house and home’. When every tree is decimated, with no foliage left to eat, they will eventually die out, or swim the Straights of Magellan up to mainland Patagonia (which some observers have already documented). It is poignant to note that this is occurring in the very place where Darwin explored with Captain Fitzroy on the Beagle during the 1830s.

This is not the actual film. These sequences are a selection of 20 second segments with no transitions, excerpted from the original work.

Etang de Pezieres III  2011red-dotred-dot

High definition (ProRes422); 52 hour loop; edition of 7

52 one hour segments that were shot weekly, based on lighting conditions chosen by the artist, in one fixed location.

This is not the actual film. These sequences are a selection of 20 second segments with no transitions, excerpted from the original work.

Field Oak  2007red-dotred-dotred-dotred-dotred-dotred-dotred-dot

High definition (HDV1080i); 52 hour loop; edition of 7

An oak tree shot once a week for an hour at sunset over the course of one year.

This is not the actual film. These sequences are a selection of 20 second segments with no transitions, excerpted from the original work.

1

La Taille des Antes: 24 hours x 60 minutes  2009red-dotred-dotred-dot

Archival pigment print; 100 x 140 cm
Edition of 7

2

La Taille des Antes: 24 hours x 60 minutes  2009 (Detail)

Archival pigment print; 100 x 140 cm

3

Lunar perigée18 x 30 Minutes  2009red-dotred-dotred-dot

Archival pigment print; 74.5 x 70 cm
Edition of 7

4

Lunar perigée18 x 30 Minutes  2009 (Detail)

Archival pigment print; 74.5 x 70 cm

field-oak-52-hour-film-30-wide-300
Field Oak: 52 weeks x 60 minutes 2009red-dotred-dotred-dotred-dotred-dotred-dot

Archival pigment print; 216 x 140 cm
Edition of 7

5

Field Oak: 52 weeks x 60 minutes  2009 (Detail)

Archival pigment print; 216 x 140 cm